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Piano Trios for kids

There are very few piano trios for the beginning student! While it’s such a nice opportunity to play together with violin and cello. I hope this book can contribute to the formation of more trio ensembles with young children. In future I will write more trios.
If you scroll down, you can see some examples of the music in PDF.
You can order Piano Trios for kids for the special prize of 15 euro (trial prize!) all separate parts included in a beautiful book (porto costs not included).
Just send a mail to: heleen.verleur@xs4all.nl
Please don’t hesitate to mail me about your experiences with this book.

Cover Trio Book

Cover Trio Book

What level pianists need to play these Trios?
After you finished Suzuki piano book 1, you can start with the trios. Techniques from Suzuki book 1 will pass by, for example:

Trio 1: down-up (Allegro) with block chords, but changing from white to black keys all the time. Many children are afraid to “go into the woods” (black keys). After this piece they will be more familiar with this.
Trio 2: left hand like Christmas-Day Secrets, octave jump (bar 25) from Chante Arabe
Trio 3: fast finger tips (Twinkle A), left hand from Chante Arabe, melody “stolen” from Allegro

The pieces are written for everyone who has had about a year of piano lessons. Because also adults will feel joy to play together with strings. Of course you can also play the pieces if you are not a Suzuki student. I tried to write music that is not difficult to remember and of course not to complicated. Because when you play together, you really have to listen to your musical friends. And to yourself. Trio music is a three-part unity, all voices speaking through each other but at the same time like a whole.

Piano Trio 1 page 1

Piano Trio 1 page 1

Piano Trio 2 page 1

Piano Trio 2 page 1

Piano Trio 3 page 1

Piano Trio 3 page 1

Keuris Componisten Concours 2014: how it went..

And short review of Jan van Eijck: “It was a splendid concert, full of freshness and musicality. In the end the winner of the contest was Aspasia Nasopoulou, a Greek composer living in the Netherlands, with a beautiful meditative piece.

According to the ensemble pieces: it was a very very close competition, for jury and public were also very favourably impressed by Heleen’s piece for flute, bassoon, piano and stamping feet, which is playful, full of rhythmic and melodic surprises, and, according to the performers, was a lot of fun to play.

Heleen’s piece will be performed again soon on June 21 by an ensemble including Helma van den Brink, bassoon player of the Concertgebouw orchestra, who also asked Heleen to write another piece. So no first prize, but still a very memorable and successful evening.”

Mind Your Step by Thomas Dulfer (bassoon), Egbert Jan Louwerse (flute) and Henry Kelder (piano) and all players using their feet to stamp on the ground

Winning composer Aspasia Nasopoulou

Winning composer Aspasia Nasopoulou

Extract from composition Aspasia Nasopoulou

Thomas Dulfer - bassoon

Thomas Dulfer (bassoon): during the rehearsal

Egbert Jan Louwerse (flute) with Henry Kelder (piano)

Egbert Jan Louwerse (flute) with Henry Kelder (piano): during the rehearsal

Dinner with the composers and musicians

Dinner with the composers and musicians